FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

Think of it this way. Our mind is made up of two parts: a conscious mind and a subconscious (or unconscious) mind. Milton Erickson, a psychiatrist who became famous for his work with hypnosis, described the relationship between the conscious and the subconscious as a horse and rider. The rider thinks that he’s in control because he’s sitting in the saddle and holding the reins. And that’s true—as long as the horse follows his directions. But what happens when the horse becomes startled and bolts off in a different direction? At that point, it’s the rider who’s going along for the ride. If your thoughts, feelings or habits are out of control, it’s because your subconscious mind is “bolting off” in a direction that is different from where you consciously want to go. The way to “tame” your subconscious mind is through hypnosis.

In psychology, hypnosis is sometimes referred to as hypnotherapy and has been used for a number of purposes including the reduction and treatment of pain. Hypnosis is usually performed by a trained therapist who utilizes visualization and verbal repetition to induce a hypnotic state.

While some practitioners make a distinction between the two titles, we use them interchangeably, and in many cases we prefer the term “hypnotist” because it encompasses a broader scope of practice. Even though we may sometimes use the term “hypnotherapist,” we do not claim to practise psychotherapy, which is an entirely different profession. The title “Consulting Hypnotist” has become popular in recent years, especially among hypnotists who want to differentiate themselves from psychotherapists.

Hypnosis conducted by a trained therapist or health care professional is considered a safe, complementary and alternative medical treatment. However, hypnosis may not be appropriate in people with severe mental illness. Adverse reactions to hypnosis are rare but may include: Headache.

The way people typically describe the feeling of being hypnotized, during hypnotherapy, is to be in a calm, physically, and mentally relaxed state, in which they are able to focus deeply on what they are thinking about. … That said, there is no right way to feel when undergoing hypnosis.

When you’re under hypnosis, your attention is highly focused, and you’re more responsive to suggestions, including behavior changes that can help you lose weight.

As a general rule perhaps 4 – 6 sessions would do the trick, and the hypnotic experience may need to be modified to better suit a persons’ personal and therapeutic needs. Once you’ve had your sessions, the hypnotist can record the script for you so that you’re able to utilize the recording at home and in your own time.

Hypnosis has been shown to be a powerful tool for helping people lose weight. In fact, one study found that, on average, people who used hypnosis lost 20 percent more than those who did not.

Hypnosis teaches us to recognize cravings, and reprograms the subconscious to be more supportive in helping to overcome urges to overeat. Finally, some people call themselves sugar addicts or carb addicts. Their cravings are for a particular food, and they can’t seem to kick their cravings for these unhealthy options.

Hypnosis may be more effective than diet and exercise alone for people looking to lose weight. … Researchers concluded that while hypnotherapy may enhance weight loss, there isn’t enough research for it to be convincing. It’s important to note that there isn’t much research in support of hypnosis alone for weight loss.

Hypnosis won’t cause you to stop smoking right away. All it really does is to reduce and eventually eliminate your cravings. … After that, it becomes quite easy to stop smoking on your own. But for those wondering if it really works, studies have shown that it is actually one of the most successful ways to stop smoking

Quitting smoking can be a real challenge. But it’s one of the best things you can do for your health. … If nicotine lozenges, patches, chewing gum, counseling, and other smoking cessation methods haven’t helped you kick the habit, don’t give up. Ask your doctor if hypnosis is an option for you.

Plus, hypnosis was highly effective; after 6 sessions 93 percent of participants, while the psychoanalysis group had just a 38 percent recovery rate. Similarly several other studies have found evidence that hypnosis is a useful treatment for smoking cessation.

The short answer is yes. Some compelling research has found that hypnosis can be an effective tool for helping you quit – with quit rates that easily beat more traditional methods. Yet, the consensus seems to be that, like with any smoking cessation program, you have to want the results.

The short answer is yes. Some compelling research has found that hypnosis can be an effective tool for helping you quit – with quit rates that easily beat more traditional methods. Yet, the consensus seems to be that, like with any smoking cessation program, you have to want the results.

Research has shown that hypnotherapy can help relieve stress, fear, and anxiety. It can also be used to help in coping with the symptoms of panic disorder. … For example, once the hypnotist has helped the client become relaxed, he may ask the person to focus on their panic attacks.

Hypnotherapy should be used as a complementary treatment to cognitive behavioral therapy. However, if you only use hypnosis to treat your anxiety, it could have effects similar to those of meditation. … You can then use this state to address anxieties and phobias.

Researchers have studied whether hypnosis can treat a variety of medical conditions, from irritable bowel syndrome to anxiety and depression. … In the case of depression, hypnotherapy sessions may be focused on helping a person achieve a state of relaxation.

Hypnosis can be used for stress management in two ways. First, you can use hypnosis to get into a deeply relaxed state, fighting tension and triggering your relaxation response. This will help to prevent health problems due to chronic stress.